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PosterCo Ltd

The Fairytale - William Merritt Chase - 1995 Felix Rose - (Genuine and Vintage) - Poster - 32 x 24

£12.50

The Fairytale - William Merritt Chase - 1995 Felix Rose

Picture is better than the photo, Black posters are awkward to photograph

NB. The Picture just shows the Picture, and leaves the Border out (Where the picture goes to the Border, the sizes will be the same)

All these sizes are approximate and in inches:
Poster including the border 32" x 24"
Just the picture with the Border removed =

These posters are unframed, and are sent rolled in a sturdy tube

However, these Posters can be framed if you wanted them to be, please contact us if you would wish them to be framed for Prices and Postage costs

William Merritt Chase was an American painter, known as an exponent of Impressionism and as a teacher. He is also responsible for establishing the Chase School, which later would become Parsons School of Design.

Chase showed an early interest in art, and studied under local, self-taught artists Barton S. Hays and Jacob Cox.

Chase's teachers urged him to travel to New York to further his artistic training. He arrived in New York in 1869, met and studied with Joseph Oriel Eaton for a short time, then enrolled in the National Academy of Design under Lemuel Wilmarth, a student of the famous French artist Jean-Léon Gerome.

Chase's talent elicited the interest of wealthy St. Louis collectors who arranged for him to visit Europe for two years, in exchange for paintings and Chase's help in securing European art for their collections.

In Europe, Chase settled at the Academy of Fine Arts, a long-standing center of art training that was attracting increasing numbers of Americans and attracted Chase because it had fewer distractions than Paris.

In Munich, Chase employed his rapidly burgeoning talent most often in figurative works that he painted in the loosely brushed style popular with his instructors.

Chase traveled to Venice, Italy in 1877 with Duveneck and John Henry Twachtman before returning to the United States in the summer of 1878, a highly skilled artist representing the new wave of European-educated American talent.

Chase worked in all media. He was most fluent in oil painting and pastel, but also created watercolor paintings and etchings.

He is perhaps best known for his portraits, and his sitters including some of the most important men and women of his time. His portrait of painter Lydia Field Emmet in 1892 depicts Emmet in a pose typically reserved for men in old masters' paintings. Emmet's hand is on her hip and she looks over her shoulder at the audience.

In addition to painting portraits and full-length figurative works, Chase began painting landscapes in earnest in the late 1880s. His interest in landscape art may have been spawned by the landmark New York exhibit of French impressionist works from Parisian dealer Durand-Ruel in 1886.


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