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Siege of Constantinople in 1453 - Bertrandon de la Broquiere - Framed Print - 16"H x 12"W

£39.99

Siege of Constantinople in 1453 - Bertrandon de la Broquiere - Framed Print - 16"H x 12"W

Bertrandon de la Bro(c)quière was a Burgundian spy and pilgrim to the Middle East in 1432–33. The book of his travels, Le Voyage d'Outre-Mer, is a detailed and lively account of the political situations and practical customs of the various regions he visited. He wrote it in French at the request of Philip the Good, Duke of Burgundy, for the purpose of facilitating a new crusade.


The Fall of Constantinople was the capture of the capital of the Byzantine Empire by an invading army of the Ottoman Empire on 29 May 1453. The conquest of Constantinople followed a 53-day siege that had begun on 6 April 1453.

The capture of Constantinople marked the end of the Roman Empire, that had lasted for nearly 1,500 years. The Ottoman conquest of Constantinople also dealt a massive blow to Christendom, as the Islamic Ottoman armies thereafter were left unchecked to advance into Europe without an adversary to their rear. After the conquest, Sultan Mehmed II transferred the capital of the Ottoman Empire from Edirne to Constantinople. Several Greek and other intellectuals fled the city before and after the siege, with the majority of them migrating particularly to Italy, which helped fuel the Renaissance.

The conquest of the city of Constantinople and the end of the Byzantine Empire marks, the end of the Middle Ages.


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