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PosterCo Ltd

London Town - Belle Sauvage - Rubens Arthur Moore - Solomon and Whitehead 1987 - Framed Print - 12"H x 16"W

£39.99

London Town - Belle Sauvage - Rubens Arthur Moore - Solomon and Whitehead 1987 - Framed Print - 12"H x 16"W

Rubens Arthur Moore was a Britsh Artist from Nottingham

The Bell Savage Inn was a former public house in London, from the 15th century to 1873. It was a playhouse during the Elizabethan Era, as well as a venue for various other entertainments. It was also an important coaching inn. Other names by which it has been known throughout history include: Savage's Inn, The Bel Savage, Belle Savage, Belle Sauvage, Bell on the Hoop, Old Bell Savage, Belly Savage and others.

In 1453, a deed gave the building's name as "Savage's Inn" or "The Bell on the Hoop". "Savage" is thought to be the name of a former, perhaps the original, proprietor; a William Savage.

In 1554, it is recorded that Sir Thomas Wyatt, leader of a popular revolt against Queen Mary, and his men, stayed at the Bell Savage

In 1568, the Inn was bequeathed to the Cutlers' Company, an old City trade guild

The Bell Savage was one of the four inns of London that were used as playhouse in the late 16th century. Richard Tarlton, the well-known comedian, performed here as did the showman William Bankes and his trick horse "Marocco".

In 1616, Pocahontas and her retinue, who had come over from Virginia, were boarded at the Bell Savage.

In 1684, the inn was advertising a "Rhynoceros, lately brought from the East Indies" which could be seen by the public for a small fee – the first rhinoceros to be exhibited in England.

Interesting Fact:
The Bell Savage featured in Dickens's "Pickwick Papers" and in Sir Walter Scott's "Kenilworth".

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